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Jet Professional 2017 – Introduction and Installation

Why to switch to and What’s New in Jet Professional 2017?

Its valid question same came to my mind also when i heard about new Release.

Then i tried to explore a bit about it and got an information about some exciting features introduced with it. I will discuss as i progress with my evaluation and exploration with these features.

Here i am giving bit overview about some features and limit to Installation topic in this post. If you wish to know more you will have to wait for my next few upcomming posts.

As per Jet Report Sources:

Jet Professional 2017 makes sharing your reports easier than ever before!  

Reporting with (and without) the Jet add-in for Excel

The Jet Web Portal is an online interface that provides an easy-to-manage repository for your organization’s reports.

Using the web interface and Office 365 Online, you can allow any of your network users – whether they have Excel and the Jet add-in installed or not – to view reports directly from their web browser.

Jet Mobile for Jet Enterprise

Jet Professional integrates with the Jet Mobile web client – allowing you to log into one site to see and run all your reports – and to see all of your business intelligence dashboards.

And… Jet Mobile for Jet Enterprise includes many new features – making your dashboards more powerful and even easier to use.

What’s New?

Publishing to the Jet Web Portal

The Jet ribbon within Excel includes the ability to publish your reports to the Jet Web Portal.  The Jet Web Portal provides a manageable repository for your organization’s reports. All your users – whether they have Excel and Jet Professional installed or not – can run and view reports directly from their web browser.

What is Jet Web Portal

Jet Professional 2017 represents a new way to manage, run and view your business reports. Designed for today’s always-connected, always-moving workforce, Jet Professional 2016 introduces a new Information Management System that allows business users access to their business reports using virtually any device through a simple web interface.

As a user, you don’t need to install anything to run and view reports. Within the Jet Web Portal, you can quickly find the report that you’re after, specify report parameters, run the report to get up-to-the-minute data and view it in Excel Online.

With features like sharing, search, version control and report permissions, Jet Professional 2017 is a complete report management system.

Will comeup with more detailed about new features in my upcomming posts.

Let us move to Installation part.

To get the installation file go to this link : https://www.jetreports.com/support/product-downloads/

After downloading you will get the Jet Professional Installation Files.Zip, extract it.

Install-1

Befor you start installation make sure no Excel instance is running on your system.

I am doing simple one system Instalation, will come up with more details and other options later.

Double click to Setup file to begin with installation.

Install-2

If you have Activation code enter it or you can continue and activate later.

Install-3

Select instalation type as desired, i am installing All Components.

Install-4

Select the features you want to install, since i am performing complete install, so i am accepting all as suggested by default.

Install-5

Select the Account to run the service, and don’t forget to select Add rules to Windows Firewall. Rest all as default suggested.

Install-6

Select the SQL Instance for Jet Service Database and login method.

Install-7

Select desired ports and host detail or accept as suggested as default.

Install-8

Enter Jet Service Tier details or accept suggested as default.

Now your pre-configuration part is completed. Click on Install to proceed with Jet Components Instalation.

Install-10

Click on Install to proceed.

Install-11

Click on Finish to exit Instalation wizard, your Jet is now installed with above provided configuration.

Install-12

Next Step is to Activate your Jet Professional.

From Jet Tab on Ribbon select Activate Jet Professional.

choose the desired option.

Install-13

Enter your activation code and click on Next.

Install-14

Copy the message and send to the mentioned e-mail id and click Next.

Install-15

Close to exit.

Wait for the Activation Token, it may take upto 24 hours to receive mail with this code.

Install-16

If you check your Start Menu you will find these components got installed.

Install-17

Once you receive your Tocken.

Launch Excel, From Jet Tab, Click on Help from ribbon and select Activate License.

Install-18

Select Enter provided Activation token.

Install-19

Copy the Token you received via mail here and click on Activate.

Install-20

If every thing is fine you will receive the Activation Successful message.

Now you are ready to start with using Jet Professional.

I will come up with more details on this in my upcomming posts till then keep exploring and learning.

 

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An Introduction to PowerShell – Profile

PowerShell is a great way to automate almost anything in Windows.

However, it’s not just a scripting language.

If you find yourself using it as a command line shell it may be useful to store your functions and customizations in a profile that gets loaded every time you load the Console.

The first thing we do here is check if we already have a profile. There is an automatic variable, $Profile, that stores the fully qualified location of the PowerShell profile. An easy way to check if any profile exists is to use the Test-Path cmdlet on the $Profile variable.

Test-Path $Profile

PS-18

As you can see no profile file yet created for me, so we will create one, we can easily do that with the New-Item cmdlet.

New-Item –Path $Profile –Type File –Force

Using the force parameter will cause a profile to be created even if already we have one. This means our old profile will be overwritten and new will be created.

PS-19

Profile can be edit using notepad, which can be easily started using PowerShell.

notepad $Profile

PS-20

You can put any commands, functions, alias’s and even module imports into your PowerShell profile.

I normally work on PowerShell for Navision so I would prefer loading module whenever I launch the PowerShell command, so I include my cmdlets for loading the same in my profile.

PS-21

Save the Profile and close the PowerShell. Next time I launch PowerShell this Module get loaded for me by default.

Finally, I would like to also have some customizations to the console. One is it basically determines if you have opened an elevated PowerShell console and changes the font colour, this way I will always remember that I am running with elevated privileges.

Let us Save the Profile and check the effect of this Profile.

PS-22

That’s all for today.

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts.

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

 

An Introduction to PowerShell – Execution Policies

PowerShell has something called Execution Policies, which stop you from just running any old script. In fact, by default, you can’t run any scripts and need to change your execution policy if you want to be allowed to run them. There are 4 notable Execution Policies:

  • Restricted: This is the default configuration in PowerShell. This setting means that no script can run, regardless of its signature. The only thing that can be run in PowerShell with this setting is an individual command.
  • AllSigned: This setting does allow scripts to run in PowerShell. The script must have an associated digital signature from a trusted publisher. There will be a prompt before you run the scripts from trusted publishers.
  • RemoteSigned: This setting allows scripts to be run, but requires that the script and configuration files that are downloaded from the Internet have an associated digital signature from a trusted publisher. Scripts run from the local computer don’t need to be signed. There are no prompts before running the script.
  • Unrestricted: This allows unsigned scripts to run, including all scripts and configuration files downloaded from the Internet. This will include files from Outlook and Messenger. The risk here is running scripts without any signature or security. It is recommenced that you never us this setting.

To see what your current Execution Policy is set to, open a PowerShell Console and type:

Get-ExecutionPolicy

PS-14

Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned

PS-15

To run this command you need to run the PowerShell with Administrative rights. Right click on icon and select Run as Administrator and try the command again.

PS-16

When i run PowerShell as Administrator, now i am able to execute the command successfully as in below screen.

PS-17

The proper term for a PowerShell command is a cmdlet, and from now on we will use this correct terminology. It just felt more appropriate to call them commands for this introduction.

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts.

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

 

 

 

 

 

An Introduction to PowerShell – ForEach

ForEach simply looks at a set of list and pulls out one at a time to look at them and then, perform some type of action or set of commands on it.

One different part of a ForEach loop is the keyword in that lives within that parenthetical statement. That tells PowerShell to create a single variable to hold the values that come out, one at a time, for your list.

Let’s define a variable with list of Fruits

$names = “Apple”,”Banana”,”Grape”,”Orange”,”Chiku”

When we make a list within a variable, we have created an array, which is simply a sort of matrix thing that PowerShell holds in memory that lets it store a lots of things at one time.

Let’s also initialize a count variable so we get a feel of how the loop is going.

$count = 0

Let’s use a ForEach loop to count how many names we have. Remember our keyword in we have to create a new variable that we can call FruitName. This holds each single name that comes out of that list of names we have stored in the variable $names.

ForEach ($FruitName in $names)

{

$count += 1

Write-Host “$FruitName”

}

 

Finally, I’ll add a simple Write-Host line after the end (after the right curly brace, that is) to display the count, so we can actually give us the count of names in the list of Fruits.

Write-Host “The total number of names is $count.”

 

Here is the output of above script.

PS-13

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts.

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

An Introduction to PowerShell – Do While

Do While is the simplest of the looping constructs in PowerShell.

A looping construct is basically a piece of code that repeats the same action over and over again to a set of iteration, it loops through a set of statements, doing some action in each of its iteration, until some condition is met or that set of statement is exhausted.

Do While is simply a construct that says to PowerShell, “repeat set of things until some condition becomes true”.

For example, let’s set up a control variable called count and give it an initial value of one.

$count = 1

Then, let’s set up a simple Do While construct that adds 1 to whatever value of count is already in that variable, until the variable has the number 10 in it.

Do

{

$count = $count + 1

Write-Host “The current value of the variable is $count”

} While ($count –lt 10)

 

PS-10

Another way of doing same is:

You can also set up a Do While construct so that your set of commands only executes when the condition is true. You just need to eliminate the do statement, and only use while.

While ($count –lt 10)

{

$count = $count + 1

Write-Host “The current value of the variable is $count”

}

PS-11

Only difference in above both way of using Do While construct is in first way if we initialize Count with 11 then also the loop with execute once as the condition is tested after loop is executed at least once if condition is satisfied the loop will continue else will exit. Where as in second way the condition is tested before it enters the loop and will exit before first iteration of the loop.

PS-12

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts. 

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

 

 

An Introduction to PowerShell – If/Then

The simplest form of decision making in PowerShell is the if/then mechanism.

The code that runs if your comparison clause is YES/TRUE or NO/FALSE must be surrounded within curly braces, it is best practice to put these curly braces on lines by themselves so that you can match them up when you are writing more complicated scripts.

If condition is met then

{

Do This

}

Else

{

Do This

}

Example:

If (20 –gt 15)

{

Write-Host “20 is Greater than 15”

}

 

PS-7

Here the –gt is the PowerShell switch for “greater than”.

 

Another Example using Nesting

If (20 –gt 25)

{

Write-Host “20 is Greater than 25”

}

elseif (25 –gt 20)

{

Write-Host “25 is Greater than 20”

}

PS-8

You can include n number of these elseif blocks in your script, there is no maximum limit for how many times it occurs in script.

If (10 –gt 11)

{

Write-Host “10 is Greater than 11”

}

elseif (11 –lt 10)

{

Write-Host “11 is Less than 10”

}

elseif (20 –gt 40)

{

Write-Host “20 is Greater than 40”

}

else

{

Write-Host “None of above conditions are true”

}

PS-9

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts.

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

An Introduction to PowerShell – basics and how to define Variables

PowerShell is built into Windows, so there is no requirement of separate fee or licensing cost. In addition, different server products come with their own Power Shells, too, which expands the capability to do things you want using PowerShell.

For demo purpose I am using Windows PowerShell ISE.

PS-1

An introduction to scripts

Scripts in PowerShell are basically just text files with the special filename extension of ps1.

To create a script, you enter a series of PowerShell commands in a sequence in a new Notepad file or any text editor you like, and then save that file with extension as .ps1, where name of your file is a friendly description of your script with no spaces.

 

PS-2

How do I run my scripts?

To run a PowerShell script that you already have, you enter in a PowerShell window either:

The full path (folder and file name) of the script, like so: c:\powershell\myscript.ps1

Or

If your script is in the current directory the console is looking at, use a period and then a backslash, like this: .\myscrip.ps1

Other than this, there is nothing special needed for creating a script in PowerShell. You can simply add the commands you like.

 

PS-3

How do I define Variables?

In PowerShell, variables always have a dollar sign ($) prefixed before them.

Let us declare few variables right now:

$name = ‘Ashwini’

$anynumber = 111074

$location = ‘Ghaziabad’

$listofnumbers = 15,20,35,40

 

PS-4

If I want to define a variable with text as its value, I will require to add a single quote on either side of the text value.

Let’s say we want to find out the total number of cmdlets available on the system, we can use:

(get-command).count

 

PS-5

Let’s declare a variable to store that count in. We’ll call it

$numbersofcmdlets

We will store output in this variable of the (get-command).count .

$numbersofcmdlets = (get-command).count

Now we can use this variable as part of something else.

For a simple example, let’s look at the Write-Host cmdlet, which simply writes text to the screen of the machine hosting the PowerShell session. Write-Host has a lots of capabilities, but in its simplest form, you can just say:

Write-Host “Dynamics Nav Blog Site by Ashwini Tripathi”

You can integrate variables with Write-Host. You just call them with the dollar sign notation and work them right into your text.

For example, I can say:

Write-Host “There are $numbersofcmdlets commands available for use on this system.”

 

PS-6

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts. 

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.

 

 

Important

Most of the contents you find in this blog will be either inherited from MSDN or Navision Developer IT Pro Help. Some places images are also directly taken from these sites. Purpose is simple to try those stuffs and re-produce adding few things as per my understanding to make easy understanding for others and quick reference.

Here nothing under my own brand or authorship of the content. At any point of time we are just promoting Microsoft stuffs nothing personnel with same.

Hope stuffs used here will not violate any copyright agreement with them. In case by mistake or in-intestinally it happens and the Microsoft feels these should not be used Microsoft have full right to inform me about same and will be glad to take down any such content which may be violating the norms.

Purpose is to promote Navision and share with community.

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