Development Tips, How To, Information, PowerShell, Tip & Tricks

An Introduction to PowerShell – Profile

PowerShell is a great way to automate almost anything in Windows.

However, it’s not just a scripting language.

If you find yourself using it as a command line shell it may be useful to store your functions and customizations in a profile that gets loaded every time you load the Console.

The first thing we do here is check if we already have a profile. There is an automatic variable, $Profile, that stores the fully qualified location of the PowerShell profile. An easy way to check if any profile exists is to use the Test-Path cmdlet on the $Profile variable.

Test-Path $Profile

PS-18

As you can see no profile file yet created for me, so we will create one, we can easily do that with the New-Item cmdlet.

New-Item –Path $Profile –Type File –Force

Using the force parameter will cause a profile to be created even if already we have one. This means our old profile will be overwritten and new will be created.

PS-19

Profile can be edit using notepad, which can be easily started using PowerShell.

notepad $Profile

PS-20

You can put any commands, functions, alias’s and even module imports into your PowerShell profile.

I normally work on PowerShell for Navision so I would prefer loading module whenever I launch the PowerShell command, so I include my cmdlets for loading the same in my profile.

PS-21

Save the Profile and close the PowerShell. Next time I launch PowerShell this Module get loaded for me by default.

Finally, I would like to also have some customizations to the console. One is it basically determines if you have opened an elevated PowerShell console and changes the font colour, this way I will always remember that I am running with elevated privileges.

Let us Save the Profile and check the effect of this Profile.

PS-22

That’s all for today.

I will come up with more stuffs in my upcoming posts.

Till then keep practicing and stay tuned for more details.